Student Nurse Laura

Orem – "creative effort of one human being to help another human being."

Posts Tagged ‘studentnurselaura’

ACLS

Posted by Laura on December 30, 2010

Yea! Another Certification!

Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support

I took the ACLS class at Life Support Associates in Acton, CA and and passed my test! The CD comes with a good pre-test you are required to take, but I also liked the ACLS-Algorithms.com site.

The algorithms are a great way to help understand the priorities and what works with each condition.

follow to AHA

A couple days of self-study, two days of classes and examination and I now have a card – but am I really capable of the skills this card says I am? No, not really, but I’ll know the processes and can be an effective team member.

I was listening to a song on my way to the examination, “Leave no stone unturned, leave your fears behind”.

I think this goes well with the nursing program!

The music bar links to a cycle of their songs

lyrics

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Seasonal URIs

Posted by Laura on November 16, 2010

Seasonal variation of selected upper respiratory tract infection pathogens. PIV is parainfluenza virus, RSV is respiratory syncytial virus, MPV is metapneumovirus, and Group A Strept is group A streptococcal disease.

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OM

Posted by Laura on November 15, 2010

OM – Otitis Media: inflammation of middle ear w/o reference to etiology or pathogenesis

AOM – Acute Otitis Media: above w/ rapid onset of s/s: fever, ear pain

Otalgia – ear pain

OME – Otitis Media with Effusion: fluid in middle ear space w/o symptoms of acute infection

COME – Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion: middle ear effusion persisting > 3 months

Otorrhea – purulent discharge

1st line medication: PO amoxicillin

2nd line medicaiton: amoxicillin-clavulanate; azithoromycin and cephalosporins: cefdinir, cefuroxime, and cefpodoxime.

3rd line medication: ceftriaxone – painful at IM site

Antihistamines & decongestants are not recommended.

Antibiotic ear drops have no value in Tx AOM

(Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing)

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Asthma Drug Therapy

Posted by Laura on November 15, 2010

Asthma – Drug Therapy

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From Tabers: Why shouldn’t you give Aspirin to a child who has viral symptoms?

Posted by Laura on November 15, 2010

Reye’s syndrome

[R. D. K. Reye, Australian pathologist, 1912–1977]
A syndrome marked by acute encephalopathy and fatty infiltration of the liver and often of the pancreas, heart, kidney, spleen, and lymph nodes.
It is seen primarily in children under age 18, after an acute viral infection such as chickenpox or influenza. The mortality rate depends on the severity of the central nervous system involvement but may be as high as 80%. Fortunately, the disease occurs rarely. The cause of the disease is unknown, but association with increased use of aspirin and other salicylates is evident from epidemiological studies.
See: Nursing Diagnoses Appendix

SYMPTOMS
The patient experiences a viral infection with a brief recovery period, followed in about 1 to 3 days by severe nausea and vomiting, a change in mental status (disorientation, agitation, coma, seizures), and hepatomegaly without jaundice in 40% of cases. The disease should be suspected in any child with acute onset of encephalopathy, nausea and vomiting, or altered liver function, esp. after a recent illness. The severity of the syndrome depends on how badly the brain swells during the illness, reflected in increased intracranial pressure (ICP).

Aspirin and other salicylates should not be used for any reason in treating children under age 18 with viral infections.

TREATMENT
Supportive care includes intravenous administration of fluids and electrolytes, administration of corticosteroids, and ventilatory assistance. Electrolytes should be controlled carefully, along with serum glucose and ammonia levels, and neurological status.

PATIENT CARE
Increased ICP resulting from increased cerebral blood volume results in intracranial hypertension. To decrease intracranial pressure and cerebral edema, fluids are provided at 2/3 maintenance level and an osmotic diuretic or furosemide is prescribed. The head of the bed is kept at a 30-degree angle. Fluid intake should maintain urine output at 1.0 ml/kg/hour, plasma osmolality at 290 mOsm (normal to high), and blood glucose at 150 mg/ml (high), while preventing fluid overload. Proteins are restricted to keep ammonia levels low. Hypoprothrombinemia (resulting from liver injury) is treated with vitamin K, or fresh frozen plasma if needed. Temperature is monitored, and prescribed measures to alleviate hyperthermia are instituted. Seizure precautions are also instituted. Intake and output are monitored carefully. The patient is observed for evidence of impaired hepatic function, such as signs of bleeding or encephalopathy. All treatments are explained to parents and support is provided to them. The National Reye’s Syndrome Foundation provides information and support.

 

All material is from Tabers at: http://www.tabers.com/tabersonline/ub/view/Tabers/143910/24/Reye%27s_syndrome

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Top Hat Making

Posted by Laura on October 12, 2010

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Top Hat for CNSA – featuring Student Nurse Flo

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Dystonia vs Dyskinesia

Posted by Laura on September 17, 2010

Our class in Psych requires you to know the difference between Dystonia and Dyskinesia. Sure – everyone studies transference vs countertransference, neurosis vs psychosis, empathy vs sympathy… but this one is hard.

click on image to go to Dystonia Association of Kentucky

Medline Plus says “Dystonia is a movement disorder which causes involuntary contractions of your muscles. These contractions result in twisting and repetitive movements. Sometimes they are painful.

Dystonia can affect just one muscle, a group of muscles or all of your muscles. Symptoms can include tremors, voice problems or a dragging foot. Symptoms often start in childhood. They can also start in the late teens or early adulthood. Some cases worsen over time. Others are mild.”

I liked this reference next at Medical News Today:

“TERMINOLOGY

There are two major classifications of movement disorders, dystonias and dyskinesias. There are also two time frames used to classify the onset of symptoms. Dystonias are spasms of individual muscles or groups of muscles. They can be sustained or intermittent, sudden or slow, painful or painless. They can affect any of the body’s voluntary muscles including those of the vocal cords. The movements of dystonias can appear very bizarre and deliberate but are involuntary.

Dyskinesias are involuntary, often hyperkinetic movements of various types that have no purpose and are not fully controllable by the patient. Some are random, some rhythmic, most are very odd looking and socially stigmatizing.

They can affect the ability to initiate or stop a movement as in Parkinson’s. They can affect the smooth movement of a joint resulting in a jerky articulation. Abrupt and seemingly violent movements of a limb are common as are gyrations of any body part. Tics and involuntary vocalizations are related to dyskinesias.”

Tardive means “characterized by lateness,  esp. pert. to a disease in which the characteristic sign or symptoms appear late in the course of the disease” (Tabers).

So even though both processes includes the unusual movements, dytonia is often recognized as slow and is involuntary where there is no pt control. Dykinesia is a later process of dystonia(?? still not too certain here), but is a more often a  ‘rapid’ movement and is sometimes controllable by the patient, yet still involuntary. When you have Tardive before either process, it means it is the late onset of.

more:

The word dyskinesia (dis-ki-ne´ze-a) is logically derived from two Greek roots: dys-, trouble + kinesis, movement = trouble moving.

dystonia is from dys- + -tonia from Greek tonos tension, from teinen to stretch = trouble tension/stretch

So do they both include the tongue? yes.

Here is a good site American Association of Neurological Surgeons

It shows dystonia, dykinesia, parkinsons, ataxia, myoclonus, tourette syndrome….. There are links also to many organizations for resource information.

Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia & Parkinson Foundation
Huntington’s Disease Society of America
International Rett Syndrome Foundation
Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
National Parkinson Foundation
Tardive Dyskinesia
Tourette Syndrome Association, Inc
Tourette Syndrome Online

Posted in Day-to-Day, NS 232 - Psych, Ger, CH, Semester III | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on July 8, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on July 7, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on July 6, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on July 5, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on July 4, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on July 3, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on July 2, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on July 1, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on June 30, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on June 29, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on June 28, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on June 27, 2010

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30 Student Nurse Success Secrets

Posted by Laura on June 26, 2010

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