Student Nurse Laura

Orem – "creative effort of one human being to help another human being."

Archive for March, 2015

Cancer Mortality Rates

Posted by Laura on March 31, 2015

Calculating Cancer Mortality Rates for a population is collected by the National Center of Health Statistics. They are classified by age, cancer site, race and sex.

Improvement of treatment for cancer can come from these rates. Hospital registries on cancer collect information about cancer patients. Specific diagnosis of cancer can further break down the statistics on cancer mortality rates.

ref: Horton, Loretta and Margaret Theodorakis. Calculating and Reporting Healthcare Statistics, Fourth Edition. AHIMA Press.

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Anesthesia Death Rates

Posted by Laura on March 29, 2015

Anesthesia Death Rates are from the ratio of deaths in a specific period which were caused by anesthetic agents, and the number of anesthetics administered.

Various Types of Anesthesia

  1. General
  2. Moderate
  3. Sedative
  4. Regional
  5. Local

ref: Horton, Loretta and Margaret Theodorakis. Calculating and Reporting Healthcare Statistics, Fourth Edition. AHIMA Press.

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Newborn Mortality Rates

Posted by Laura on March 27, 2015

Definitions for Newborn Deaths/Newborn Mortality Rates

Infant deaths – any time in the first year

Neonatal deaths – liveborn death within the neonatal period. 28 days

Newborn deaths – death of a hospital liveborn infant who dies during the same admission.

Perinatal deaths –  Stillborn and neonatal deaths.

Post-neonatal deaths – After the 28th day of life through the end of the first year.

Vital Statistics for Neonatal & Infant Mortality Rates

Birth certificates are used frequently for this data. The rate is times by 100,000 for use in vital statistics in the US.

ref: Horton, Loretta and Margaret Theodorakis. Calculating and Reporting Healthcare Statistics, Fourth Edition. AHIMA Press.

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Fetal Death Rates

Posted by Laura on March 25, 2015

Fetal Death Rates are calculated separately and not considered patient deaths. There are three classifications of fetal deaths:

  1. Early (< 20wks of gestation  and wt 500 gm or less)
  2. Intermediate (20-28 wks of gestation wt of 501-1000 gm.)
  3. Late (28+ and wt of 1,001 gms or more)

 

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Net Death Rate & Post-Op Death Rate

Posted by Laura on March 23, 2015

Accrediting agencies may request the Net Death Rate. This rate became important because providers had a concern on deaths less than 48 hours after admission  – they may or may not have death due to the hospitalization. Because of this, Net Death Rates excludes deaths under 48 hours.

 

Postoperative Death Rates and Surgical Death Rates refer to the same thing. It is the number of deaths occurring after an operation. In this rate, deaths 10 days after surgery are included.

Hospitals may evaluate the relationship of deaths in specific operations instead of using the postoperative death rate to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital’s care.

ref: Horton, Loretta and Margaret Theodorakis. Calculating and Reporting Healthcare Statistics, Fourth Edition. AHIMA Press.

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Mortality / Death Rates

Posted by Laura on March 21, 2015

Statistics on Death Rates is important to help public health agencies plan services where may be needed. One way this has been used is the call or need for new medical specialties. Have you heard of a doctor being a intensive care expert? The idea is intensivists can have a direct affect on death rates. There are many organizations who use this information befside hospitals and the CMS.

  • The Automobile Industry
  • Handgun Advocates
  • American Heart Association
  • American Cancer Association

To compute hospital death rates, formulas for calculating include the number of patient deaths divided by number of patient discharges (including deaths).

Note: DOA are not included, because they were not admitted to hospital.

Note: Fetal deaths,ER, and out-patients, are not included.

ref: Horton, Loretta and Margaret Theodorakis. Calculating and Reporting Healthcare Statistics, Fourth Edition. AHIMA Press.

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Review for Exam

Posted by Laura on March 16, 2015

Some simple math calculations for review. Much like math for nursing, healthcare statistics has some basic concepts that progress in complexity. Knowing the exactly where the information is coming from, how to get the statistics, and what the results represent is the most important. But, for now, I’m just going to post some simple calculations and will comprise all in an excel document for future use.

Fraction to Percent – Fraction to Percent Calculator

Percent to Decimal – Percent to Decimal Calculator

How to get the Ratio – Ratio Calculator

Average (mean) – Average Calculator (Mean)

Sum of all values / Number of all the values involved

Census

Definitions

Census- calculate census, – Total number of patients treated during a 24 hour period.

Inpatient Service Days – Services received by one inpatient in 24 hour period.

Total Inpatient Service Days – Sum of all inpatient service days for each of the days in the period.

Purpose – planning, budgeting and staffing.

FORMULA – Average Daily Census:

Total inpatient service days (excluding newborns) / Total number of days in the period.

for a Unit:

Total inpatient service days for the unit for the period / Total number of days in the period

 – for NB :

Total newborn inpatient service days for a period / Total number of days in the period

Occupancy

Definitions

Inpatient bed count – Number of available hospital beds, both occupied and vacant, on any given day.

Inpatient Bed count day – Counts the presence of one inpatient bed (occupied or vacant)that is set up and staffed for use in one 24 hour period.

Total inpatient bed count day – Sum of inpatient bed count days for each of the days in a period.

FORMULA – Percentage of occupancy – Total number of inpatient service days for a period (x 100) / total inpatient bed count days in the period (Bed count x Number of days in the period)

FORMULA – Percent of occupancy FOR Newborn Bassinet Occupancy Ration – Total newborn inpatient service days for a period x 100 / Total newborn bassinet count x Number of days in the period.

FORMULA – Bed Turnover Rate (direct)- total number of discharges for a period / average bed count for the same period.

FORMULA – Bed Turnover Rate (indirect)- Occupancy rate x Number of days in a period / average length of stay. Note: Used when the bed count changes during the period in question.

Length of Stay

Definitions

Length of Stay – Number of calendar days from admission to discharge.

Total length of stay – Sum of the days stay of any group of inpatients discharged during specific period of time.

Purpose – Utilization management to evaluate the facilities efficiency in provideing services cost-effectively, while evaluating level of care, example – Financial reporting

FORMULA – Length of Stay- calculate using discharge days (no Newborns) – Total length of stay of discharged patients for a given period / total number of discharges and deaths in the same period

Average Length of Stay  – Toatl length of stay (discharge days) / Total discharges (including deaths)

FORMULA – Average Newborn Length of Stay – Total newborn discharge days / total newborn discharges (including deaths)

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